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Small sounds, big city

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 Today’s music scene usually consists of the same old artists and cliché lyrics. The stereotypical teen listens to whatever happens to be on the charts that week, however, there are a select few who opt out of what the rest of society chooses and searches for their own personalized sound provided by smaller artists. “To me, music is kind of a gateway to express yourself,” junior Sam Colaccino said. “Everything you want to say you can put it into a song. It brings people together which is great.”

It can be argued that artists who are not as popular, bring people together due to smaller and more personal venues. A popular venue which attracts a lot of these musicians, in particular, is the Black Cat, located in northwest Washington D.C. This venue has a room on the called the Mainstage, which  has hosted underground/alternative acts, whether they are local or not. This venue creates a unique atmosphere for the people attending. “Small performances are really cool because people have to genuinely know the band to find the gig,” sophomore Annika Paletski said. “So, everyone is there because they actually know the band and are real fans. Unlike big venues, you get more of a relaxed vibes and it’s more of a personal connection.”

Lesser known artists tend to perform in smaller venues since they do not necessarily have the fan base yet to support a venue like the Verizon Center in Washington D.C. Some common venues that small artists play at in Washington D.C. include DC9 nightclub, 9:30 Club, Jammin’ Java, Epicure Cafe and Electric Maid. “Probably my most memorable concert, I saw HUNNY,  was at the DC9 nightclub. It was months ago, yet every moment is still playing through my head on repeat.” sophomore Greta Engel said. “It helped that the venue was small especially, because it made everything more personal.”

Aside from a having what some would describe as an ‘idiosyncratic vibe’, seeing less-known artists perform gives a person memories and new friendships that would not happen otherwise. “I loved seeing one of my favorite artists, Greyson Chance, before he broke out,” senior Tulsi Shyamsundar-Jipp said. “I was able to listen to incredible music, which was made even better because it felt like everyone in the crowd had the artists full attention.”

Despite everyone having a different music interest, it is common knowledge that music is a powerful part of our everyday lives. Not only does music bring people together, but small concert events lead to people and memories you never would have met or experienced without it. This especially speaks to those who play instruments. “As a musician myself, music has just been a big part of my life. I don’t know what I would do without music and to live without it life would be a hell of a lot more boring,” Colaccino said. “Through music, I’ve made so many friends that I never thought I’d meet otherwise. There’s such a big community behind these artists, so I think people should give small bands a chance.”

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The student newspaper of Washington-Lee High School
Small sounds, big city